Science says these 7 tactics will help you win any argument

November 2016

Peter Ditto, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, is quoted in both the Nordic Business Insider and New
York magazine. In light of the recent elections, he, along with other experts, identify what tactics must be used in
order to convey your opinions during a political argument in a courteous and educated way.
 
From both New York and Nordic Business Insider:
 
"When people have their self-worth validated in some way, they tend to be more receptive to information that
challenges their beliefs," political psychologist Peter Ditto from the University of California at Irvine tells New York
Magazine.
 
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Remembering Childhood Trauma That Never Happened

November 2016
 
Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law and Society,
is featured in New York magazine for her contributions towards understanding the nature of false memories, and
how prevalent it is within our society and law enforcement.
 
From New York:
 
No matter how bizarre or alien the scenario seems, it’s never so strange that you cannot convince someone it
actually happened. “We are almost at the point of having a recipe for how to do this,” Loftus says. “A first step
involves trying to make people feel something is plausible. In questionable therapy, people are told that many, many people have repressed
memories and that you need to uncover them to feel better. That is a plausibility-enhancing message.”
 

Loftus to be named AAAS Felllow

November 2016
 
Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law and Society, has
been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general
scientific society. She is recognized for her significant contributions to social psychology, particularly human memory and
its application to legal proceedings, and for dedicated service to AAAS on its board of directors. She joins eight University of California, Irvine researchers for this honor.

Loftus awarded 2016 John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science

November 2016
 
Elizabeth Loftus is recognized for pioneering work on malleability of human memory
 
Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior and Criminology, Law & Society at the University of California, Irvine, was awarded the international John Maddox Prize for Standing up for Science today
in London. Best known for her groundbreaking work on the “misinformation effect” – in which the memories of
eyewitnesses are altered by exposure to incorrect information about events – she was also honored for her
pioneering research on the creation and nature of false memories.
 
“I could hardly contain my excitement when I first learned that I would receive the prize, especially since it recognizes
the work of people who promote sound, credible science that bears on a matter of public interest and who have faced tough challenges in the process,” Loftus said.
 

Whose life should your car save?

November 2016

Azim Shariff, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, and his colleagues wrote an op-ed piece
in The New York Times, highlighting their research that has been featured in other media outlets.Their research
sheds light on whether Americans would choose between “self-protective” autonomous cars that protected their
passengers at all costs and “utilitarian” autonomous cars that impartially minimized overall casualties, even if it
meant harming their passengers.
 

Local GOP eyes future under Trump

November 2016
Peter Ditto, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, is quoted in The Orange County Register, giving
insight on the relations between Orange County Republicans and the newly elected Republican president.
 
From The Orange County Register:
 
On the plus side for Republicans everywhere is that their party now controls the White House and both
congressional chambers.
 
“At least in the short term, I think even the ‘Never Trumpers' will rally together,” said Peter Ditto, a social psychologist who studies political behavior at UC Irvine. “Whether that will hold or not will depend on how successful Trump is.”
 

Trump Supporters, Come to Therapy with Me?

November 2016

Jessica Borelli, Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior, wrote an op-ed piece for The Huffington Post, urging readers to facilitate therapy-like conversations with others in regards to the divided opinions of this year's elections. By doing so, readers will have a more compassionate and empathetic response to others and be more likely to understand different perspectives towards the outcomes of this election.

Photo Credit: The Huffington Post

 

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